Nick nack patty wack give a dog a bone

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This old man (knick-knack paddy-whack) Lyrics

nick nack patty wack give a dog a bone

This old man, he played one. He played nick-nack on my drum, With a nick-nack paddy wack give a dog a bone. This old man came rolling home. This old man.

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The origins of this song are obscure. The earliest extant record is a version noted in Anne Gilchrist 's Journal of the English Folk Dance and Song Society , learnt from her Welsh nurse in the s under the title "Jack Jintle" with the lyrics: [1]. My name is Jack Jintle, the eldest but one, And I can play nick-nack upon my own thumb. With my nick-nack and click-clack and sing a fine song, And all the fine ladies come dancing along. My name is Jack Jintle, the eldest but two, And I can play nick-nack upon my own shoe.

This old man knick-knack paddy-whack Lyrics. This old man, he played one, He played knick-knack on my thumb. With a knick-knack, paddy whack, Give a dog a bone, This old man came rolling home. This old man, he played two, He played knick-knack on my shoe. This old man, he played three, He played knick-knack on my knee. This old man, he played four, He played knick-knack on my door.

Top definition. The phrase originated from the old English nursery rhyme, "This old man". Nick nack or " knick knack " refers to the sound produced when playing the bones, as a musical instrument that later evolved into using metal spoons held loosely between the finger and stroked across a board, a shoe or most commonly the fingers of the opposite hand. Each verse refers to the common practice in Ireland of of after a feast of lamb or swine, taking the rib bones and fashioning them into a musical instrument, using it as a rhythmic instrument of an impromptu band that might also include a lute and singers. Paddywhack has several meaning and it is unclear which meaning the nursery rhyme intended.

This old man, he played one, He played knick knack on my thumb.
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Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Sign me up! Paddy is slang for a police officer and whack is slang for murder. Full points to the person who came up with that creative explanation! Paddywhackery and yes, there is such a word is the word that describes the stereotypical portrayal of the Irish in stage productions. But does this mean that a paddywhack is some kind of Irishman? Paddy was short for Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, and according to Francis Grose, all this made sense when viewed this way.

Mike Yates commented in the accompanying booklet:. According to Frank Kidson, this was originally a children's singing game although, as a child, I remember it more as a song used to raise flagging morale on long country walks. Certainly, there must have been a popular recording of it for the song to have been so widely known in fifties England. I suspect that George may have confused verses 7 and 11, which should probably be swapped around i. Chorus after each verse : With a nig-a-nog, pud-a-log, Give a dog a bone, My old man came rolling home.

This traditional rhyme was first published in but almost certainly originates from earlier possibly from the time of the Irish potato famine. The biggest clue to the meaning lies in the lyrics most particularly 'paddywhack' and to a lesser extent 'knick-knack'. A Paddy is still used by the English to refer to the Irish. Whack means to hit once hard and forcefully. A knick-knack is a trinket or other trivial object. Knick-knack may also refer to the practice of tapping out a rhythm using spoons. Historically there was a great deal of resentment by the Irish people towards the English who conquered Ireland and began to settle in the sixteenth century.



This Old Man

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2 thoughts on “Nick nack patty wack give a dog a bone

  1. "This Old Man" is an English language children's song, counting and nursery rhyme with a With my nick-nack and click-clack and sing a fine song, And all the fine With a knick-knack paddywhack, Give a dog a bone, This old man came.

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