What is a blind stitch foot used for

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How To Sew A Blind Hem

what is a blind stitch foot used for

This presser foot can use for overcast stitches along edge seam your garment also. In this tutorial I'm going to show you two ways how to use a blind hem.

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My favourite hemming technique, the blind hem can appear confusing, but once you have done it a couple of times it becomes a breeze. This is the hem used on trousers, skirts and jackets for an almost invisible finish. You will need to use a matching thread for your fabric, in this example I have used a contrasting thread so you can see the nibbled stitches used to sew this hem. The Stitch for the hem is a few straight stitches to the right then a jump to the left, where the nibble is taken from your hem fabric. You will need to press a double fold hem which is then folded back on itself. The bulk of the stitches are sewn on the hem showing right side up to the right with only the larger jump stitches moving across to attach the hem of the main fabric showing wrong side up to the left.

Most commonly, this foot is used to make a blind hem on the bottoms of pants, curtains, etc. However, I like to use the blind hem foot to create the perfect topstitch.
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A blind hem stitch is used a lot in home sewing projects. It is mostly used for side and bottom hems of shades and draperies. Most sewing machines today have a blind stitch setting. The stitch looks like this above. You should experiment with what works best for your fabric and project on some scrap fabric to get the right settings. STEP 2 — Turn the raw edge in to meet the pressed fold, again making sure to follow the seam allowance of your project.

Blind hems are fantastic. Using an ingenious method of folding and stitching, you can create a machine stitched hem that is nearly invisible from the outside. If you have trouble with your hems, you might consider trying another foot, if your machine accepts them. It could make all the difference. Also, make sure you have enough seam allowance for a fairly deep hem.



Blind Hem Foot

How to Make a Blind Hem

During my bespoke tailor apprenticeship, hand sewing played a big part. Sewing invisible hems was one of the first things I learned. While I am proud of my hand sewing skills, sometimes, you just want to seam to be sewn quickly so you can finally wear the garment you made. When I got my bernette 38, one of the first things I did was to hem a pair of Marlene trousers with the blind hem foot. And was pleasantly surprised how neat the seam looked. Before you start sewing, you have to prepare your hem: press hem according to your allowance and serge the edge or use a zigzag stitch to stop it from fraying.

A blind stitch in sewing is a method of joining two pieces of fabric so that the stitch thread is invisible, or nearly invisible. There are several techniques for creating a blind stitch by hand sewing. A common technique used to create a hem, or "blind hem", hides the stitches on both sides of the garment. Other techniques hide the stitch within the folds of the fabric, so that the thread is only visible when the folded material is pulled away. A sewing machine can also create a blind hem. In this case, a specialty presser foot is needed.

How to use the Blind Stitch or Blind Hem Foot

A blind hem is exactly what it sounds like: a hem with stitches you can barely see. It's perfect for window coverings, the hem at the bottom of a garment, or anywhere you want a clean finished edge. When I first started sewing, attaining a perfect blind hem was like finding the Holy Grail. And then a funny thing happened, I practiced it a few times, and realized it was really easy. It's sort of like learning to use chopsticks — at first it seems so awkward and difficult and then, suddenly, it's second nature. Try a blind hem and you'll never drop a wad of sticky rice in your lap again. This is one of our most popular techniques ever on Sew4Home; so much so, we try to re-run it at least once a year in order to stamp out the fear of blind hems for both new and returning visitors.

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You will need to use a matching thread for your fabric, in this example I have used a contrasting thread so you can see the nibbled stitches used to sew this hem.
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A blind hem is exactly what it sounds like: a hem with stitches you barely notice. It's perfect for window coverings, the hem at the bottom of a garment, or anywhere you want a clean finished edge. When I first started sewing, attaining a perfect blind hem was like finding the Holy Grail. And then a funny thing happened, I practiced it a few times, and realized it was really easy. It's sort of like learning to use chopsticks — at first it seems so awkward and difficult and then, suddenly, it's second nature. Try a blind hem and you'll never drop a wad of sticky rice in your lap again.

If you will sew pants or skirt from thick fabrics and you want make an invisible hem quickly and easily you can do it using a blind hem presser foot. This presser foot can use for overcast stitches along edge seam your garment also. In this tutorial I'm going to show you two ways how to use a blind hem presser foot. First, let's learn how to hem a garment from thick woolen fabric. At beginning you need fold the fabric and press it.

First finish the raw edge. Do this by turning it under on fine fabrics or overcasting it on medium to heavyweight fabrics. Then turn the hem up the required depth, press and pin in place. Place the fabric under the foot. Turn the handwheel towards you by hand until the needle swings fully to the left.

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